Meteogram
Meteogram is a time cross-section of data for a specific surface reporting station. The data plotted include temperatures, winds, pressure, clouds and present weather.

Solar Radiation
What we call “current solar radiation” is technically known as Global Solar Radiation, a measure of the intensity of the sun’s radiation reaching a horizontal surface. This irradiance includes both the direct component from the sun and the reflected component from the rest of the sky. The solar radiation reading gives a measure of the amount of solar radiation hitting the solar radiation sensor at any given time, expressed in Watts /sq. m (W/m2).

RAIN FALL
Terms such as "slight chance" of rain (10-20%), "chance" of rain (30-50%) or rain "likely" (60-70%) are used when there is uncertainty of receiving measurable precipitation anywhere in the forecast area. For instance, if there is only a 30-50 percent chance that rain will fall anywhere in the Mangawhai area, then the forecast will call for a "chance" of rain.

DEW POINT
Dew point is the temperature to which air must be cooled for saturation (100% relative humidity) to occur. The dew point is an important measurement used to predict the formation of dew, frost, and fog. If dew point and temperature are close together in the late afternoon when the air begins to turn colder, fog is likely during the night. Dew point is also a good indicator of the airs actual water vapor content, unlike relative humidity, which takes the airs temperature into account. High dew point indicates high vapor content; low dew point indicates low vapor content. In addition a high dew point indicates a better chance of rain and severe thunderstorms. You can even use dew point to predict the minimum overnight temperature. Provided no fronts or other weather pattern changes are expected overnight, the afternoons dew point gives you an idea of what minimum temperature to expect overnight.

HEAT INDEX
The Heat Index (HI) (or apparent temperature) is a measure of relative discomfort due to combined heat and high humidity. It was developed by R.G. Steadman (1979) and is based on physiological studies of evaporative skin cooling for various combinations of ambient temperature and humidity. As temperatures climb above 32°C and humidity goes above 40 percent, conditions are ripe for heat-related illnesses.

BAROMETRIC PRESSURE
The air that makes up our atmosphere exerts a pressure on the surface of the earth. This pressure is known as atmospheric pressure. Generally, the more air above an area, the higher the atmospheric pressure. Barometric pressure changes with local weather conditions, making barometric pressure an important and useful weather forecasting tool. High pressure zones are generally associated with fair weather, while low pressure zones are generally associated with poor weather. For forecasting purposes, the absolute barometric pressure value is generally less important than the change in barometric pressure. In general, rising pressure indicates improving weather conditions, while falling pressure indicates deteriorating weather conditions.

WIND CHILL
Wind Chill - The wind chill temperature is what the temperature "feels like" to people and animals during cold weather. Wind chill is based on the rate of heat loss from exposed skin caused by wind and cold. As the wind increases, it draws heat from the body, driving down skin temperature and eventually the internal body temperature. Once temperatures drop below -12 °C and the wind is gusting, conditions are ripe for cold-related illnesses. Below -20 °C, any wind is a major factor in frostbite and hypothermia.

CLOUD HEIGHT
The cloud height on this site is an estimate of cumulus clouds using a formula based on temperature and dew point. Actual measurements of cloud height are made with a Micropulse Lidar (MPL). This device fires a laser into the sky and measures the backscattered signal. Costs for such a device are beyond the scope of weather hobbyists.

Moon Phase Misconception...
"The most common incorrect reason given for the cause of the Moon's phases is that we are seeing the shadow of the Earth on the Moon! But this cannot be correct: when the Moon passes through the shadow of the Earth, we get a lunar eclipse. Anyone who has seen a lunar eclipse, though, might remember that the Moon actually passes through the Earth's shadow only rarely, so that can't be why the Moon has phases. The real reason for the Moon's phases depends on two things: the Moon is round, and the angle it makes with the Earth and Sun changes over its orbit."
- As Quoted From Bad Astronomy

HUMIDITY
Humidity or relative humidity measures the amount of water vapor in the air relative to the temperature. It is important in weather because humidity affects how humans feel. A hot, humid day feels hotter because we cannot sweat as effectively. A cool, dry day feels colder because moisture evaporates more easily